All About Love by Bell Hooks

I am extremely excited about having finished the third book from Emma Watson‘s feminist book club «Our Shared Shelf» All About Love. New Visions by Bell Hooks; I mean I finished it, and it‘s still March! Yuss! I‘m on schedule!
Sorry. That‘s not why we‘re here.IMG_20160322_233624I never read the blurb because if Emma Watson gives you a book to read you don‘t go questioning it, all right? But I‘m not Emma, so I might as well give you the blurb:

«The word „love“ is most often defined as a noun, yet… we would all love better if we used it as a verb,» writes bell hooks as she comes out fighting and on fire in All About Love. Here, at her most provocative and intensely personal, the renowned scholar, cultural critic, and feminist skewers our view of love as romance. In its place she offers a proactive new ethic for a people and a society bereft with lovelessness.
As bell hooks uses her incisive mind and razor-sharp pen to explore the question „What is love?“ her answers strike at both the mind and heart. In thirteen concise chapters, hooks examines her own search for emotional connection and society‘s failure to provide a model for learning to love. Razing the cultural paradigm that the ideal love is infused with with sex and desire, she provides a new path to love that is sacred, redemptive, and healing for individuals and for a nation. The Utne Reader declared bell hooks one of the „100 Visionaries Who Could Change Your Life.“ All About Love is a powerful affirmation of just how profoundly she can.

To be honest, I had some trouble getting into the book, and at times also to keep reading. For one thing, the autho‘s big on generalisations. Right from the beginning she declares that love means something inherently different for men than it does for women. I generally disagree with feminists who claim that the difference between men and women is purely in the testicles because obviously testosterone does to a certain degree define how prone someone is to violence and other traits we claim as «manly.» Still, to say that «men» see love as such and such and that this would contradict any woman‘s point of view I found difficult to accept. She doesn‘t really leave any window open for cultural norms (I‘m sure that my male Honduran friends have a different idea of love than my male friends from New Zealand), nor does she really mention that her theories could apply to both genders.

Bell Hooks is also quite quick in drawing conclusions based on her own subjective opinion on the matter. For instance, in one chaper, she states without any lead-up:Bild 28I would have liked a little more information or reasoning as to how she came to this conclusion.

There were a number of other things that I‘m not going to go into detail about; such as the fact that she continuously contradicts herself or the beforementioned subjectivity. I still rated it four out of five stars, because from 20,000 ft viewpoint I agree with her overall message. In fact, many of the things she says can be life changing if applied in day to day life.

One of the things I‘m finding most inspiring is the notion that love is a choice. If we want to be able to love we have to let ourselves be loved. I feel she‘s sort of going into what we learned from Stephen Chbowski that «We accept the love we think we deserbe.» Well, actually, what we deserve and what we don‘t is our own decision. We can decide that we deserve the best ever treatment from our friends, boyfriends, girlfriends, teachers, parents, etc. Or we can accept abuse as a norm. What is important is that it might be a bad idea to value romantic love over friendship.Bild 29Abuse is not love, the author stresses. It‘s just that sometimes we confuse it for love, especially at a young age. But I completely agree on the fact that if somebody makes you unhappy in any way it is okay for you to leave the realms of this relationship.

Over all the book tries to lay the groundwork for a more loving society. And love appears in so many different aspects of our daily lives; honesty, justice, care, nurturing, forgiveness, selflessnes… the list goes on. Essentially, these are also the foundation of peace.

I hope the sun is shining where you are and I hope you have a lunch date, as I do right now, and I also hope that you know you‘re totally and completely worthy of love, you sexy noodle!

Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

Sexy Books: Return of the Jedi by James Kahn

Just read: Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi by James Kahn

Hello lovely folks! After having read the amazing novelisation of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back I could not resist and bought the sequel, The Return of the Jedi. I‘m so sure you know the plot already but there are people, such as my mum, who only know that it‘s about hot guys fighting each other in outer space. So here comes the blurb:

«Han Solo, frozen in carbonite, has been delivered into the hands of the vile gangster Jabba the Hutt. Determined to rescue him, Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Lando Calrissian launch a hazardous mission against Jabba‘s Tattooine stronghold.
At the same time, Darth Vader and the Emperor have ordered – and begun – construction on a new and even more powerful Death Star. Their goal: to crush the Rebel Alliance once and for all. The only hope for the Rebellion is to gather all the warships of the Rebel fleet into a single giant armada… and launch a heroic, last-ditch assault on the most deadly battle station in the galaxy.»

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I must say that it was a bit of a disappointment this time; I still had fun reading it, but there were a few very typical novelisation errors in it that made me downgrade it. For example, the author has this annoying habit of constantly spelling out what R2-D2 and Chewbacca are saying, and not to be disrespectful towards their languages or anything, but who understands that?!

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Well, at least he tried! Another bummer is how whiny Leia appears. She cries all the time, especially when Han Solo says something nice. She acts like the utter overly-attached girlfriend, unwilling to let him out of her sight at all. Get a grip, girl! She has also stopped calling him «Hot Shot» – why?! That was such a great nickname for him! And Han Solo, he is acting like a dominant, abusing asshole! (maybe that‘s why?) After Luke reveals to Leia that she‘s his twin sister Han storms after her and starts shaking her while she‘s already sobbing for, like, minutes on end! And in the end when he finally learns the truth he doesn‘t just kiss her like he did in the movie, oh no! – He pushes her into the bushes in spite of her being injured – I realise he‘s trying to express his love, but that just seems a little aggressive! On the other hand, book Han and Leia are pretty much bound to create an angsty brat like Kylo Ren.

What I loved was how Darth Vader refers to Luke as «his boy». I mean – aaw! That is a whole new universe of cuteness!

Bild 21lukiAnd I must actually say that book Luke is a lot more badass than movie Luke. He doesn‘t do anything more, but following his trail of thought you can actually decipher all the conflict that must be going on inside of him. In the movie he appears to never even consider going over to the dark side, whereas in the book he falters more than once. And after all the terrible things Darth Vader has done to him and his friends, Luke only suggests that this is the darkness driving him and not actually Anakin Skywalker himself (who he considers to still be good). Could we say the same thing about terrorists and dictators? Being able to forgive him like that, that demands a lot of heart and courage. And that makes Luke some seriously cool person!

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Also he gives this really beautiful anti-war speech:

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Lastly, the author did a great job in actually somewhat valuing Leia‘s past. Her entire planet has been blown up, that‘s all of her family dead, all of her friends, everything she loved is just gone – yet, somehow Luke manages to get more sympathy for his dead mentor throughout the entire saga. Leia‘s grief is mentioned in several parts in the book, though, and we even learn a little bit about her early childhood (like the fact that she used to have a wookiee doll – aaaw!).

Thankfully last month uni has started again and I‘m forced to concentrate my nerd soul on more sophisticated reading.

Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Wow. Just wow. In all honesty, I did not think I would like this book, but I am absolutely smitten.

«Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls „father“, she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie, and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker – a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.»

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I read this book as part of Emma Watson‘s feminist book club Our Shared Shelf, and I have currently twelve tabs open, all of them full of discussion topics. It‘s way too much to discuss in a singe blog post, so I decided to instead focus on quotations. I promise I‘ll try not to spoil anything, in case The Colour Purple is still on your T-Read list. The language of the book is incredibly beautiful, and the author has the talent of bringing difficult topics to the point.

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With this simple line Alice Walker sums up the message that Celie has received her entire life. How can a woman, who keeps being told that she is nothing, keep her dignity and a sense of worth?

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This is the first time Celie sees another woman defending herself against a man. Up until that point, this has never been so much as an option to her. And Sofia, this woman, puts her own well-being before her husband, while Celie sees no other way than stay obedient and suffer through her abuse head down.

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Throughout the story Celie stays very suspicious of men. In her opinion they are all prone to violence and oppression, which is the only treatment she has ever received. Falling in love with a man, to Celie, is unconsiderable. But Alice Walker also makes it very clear that relationships based on mutual love and trust do exist, and that they have nothing to do with abuse. Also, she emphasises on the fact that a woman can indeed be in love with a man and still be empowered. Love is not a weakness, no matter who it is you love.

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One big topic The Color Purple discusses is religion. Can somebody who has been raped, had her children taken away from her and been pushed into an abusive marriage still trust in a God that‘s good and just and loving? Alice Walker presents the concept of a God that does not believe in sin but wants you to be happy and free. This is a thought that eventually pushes Celie towards emancipation and sets her free.

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Just for context, this girl has only just been raped by a stranger. And yet, she refuses to be defeated by rejecting the belittling nickname, Squeak, that her boyfriend has given her. By renaming herself, Mary Agney resists the patriarchal words he has imposed on her. By doing so, she refuses to let the man in her life gain interpretive control over her.

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People can change and, more importantly, people can be forgiven. When Celie finds the strength and the courage to leave her husband and finally be her own woman, the man who has been nothing but a possessive and lazy bastard finally gains control over his life and finds some sort of inner centre. It is made very clear throughout the story that violence creates more violence, and that no person is violent or oppressive by chance. Celie‘s husband had a father who decided over his head what his fate was to be, so he saw no other way than to control the life of his wive. It‘s only when she takes this piece of control away from him that he sees a way to change.

To me The Color Purple is about love and discovering your worth, and this is made to count for men and women alike. It‘s a complicated setting because women are twice the victim – once in their role as women, but also by being black.

While reading the book, all I could think of was how privileged I am! I could have been anybody, but instead I‘ve been born into a white upper middle class family in freakin‘ Switzerland. If I were even so much as involuntarily touched by anyone people would consider this a violation and support me. No one has ever told me that I‘m worth less because of my race or gender. And that makes me feel so, so lucky!

Definitely read The Color Purple, you‘ll cry and laugh and you‘ll want to spread love. Really, you‘ll just want to wave this book around because it feels as if everyone should read it and that would make the world a much brighter place. Yes, it‘s that good!

Sexy Books: Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse by David Mitchell

Just read: Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse. And Other Lessons from Modern Life by David Mitchell.

Ever since I started watching Would I lie to you David Mitchell has become one of my favourite comedians. He is relatably awkward (relatable to me, that is) and his jokes are just so profound and smart that I almost pee myself when he brings them on!

IMG_20160302_200237So you can imagine how excited I was when I found his new book lying underneath the christmas tree last year! The blur:

«Why is every film and TV programme a sequel or a remake?
Why are people so f***ing hung up about swearing?
Why do the asterisks in that sentence make it ok?
Why do so many people want to stop other people doing things, and how can they be stopped from stopping them?

These and many other questions trouble David Mitchell. Join him on a tour of the absurdities of modern life – from Ryanair to Richard III, Downton Abbey to phone etiquette, UKIP to hotdogs made of cats. Funny, provocative and shot through with refreshing amounts of common sense, Thinking About It Inly Makes It Worse celebrates and commiserates on the state of things in our not entirely glorious modern world.»

What I loved about the book was that David Mitchell really comments on a big number of topics that I either find myself thinking about in everyday life or that have been bothering me for quite some time on a more serious level. Like Harry Potter (which is something I‘m never not thinking of!); David Mitchell is not a huge fan himself, and although that is a hard thing to forgive, what he writes about the Harry Potter fans is so, so true:

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Something (very unrelated to Harry Potter) that I have been hellbent on defending ever since I saw a documentary about it on New Zealand television, is pole dancing. I can‘t even remember what the documentary said that was so enlightning, but I would have taken up pole dancing right there and then – had it not been for the fact that I was only fifteen and no one would let me. Quite to my delight David Mitchell has an opinion about pole dancing as well, but it‘s not the one I originally held. He describes a course offer at Cambridge University that wants to teach young women the art of pole dancing. I thought that sounded pretty cool, until I read the following paragraph:

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Yaaayy, feminism! Whoohooo! I like this example because it underlines what he‘s trying to show the reader throughout the entire book – that everything has multiple sides to it and we shouldn‘t agree with something all too easily. At least, that‘s what I figured upon finishing it.

I must say I thought the book would be way funnier, and was then surprised to see that David Mitchell is just too smart. He comments a lot on politics and historical events which are a bit hard to understand or relate to if you‘re not from the UK. Because the books consists almost entirely of columns he‘s written for The Observer many of the topics and jokes would have to be put in context.

But having said that, the writing is incredible, and I did laugh a lot; it‘s nowhere near boring! You also don‘t have to read the whole thing in one go, the chapters are so short you can read one while having a dump! (way to praise a book, I know!) I loved it and before I let you go, here‘s one last quote:

(this is the picture he‘s commenting on, and showing you this saves me a whole paragraph of typing)

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Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem

BIG NEWS! Except not really big. And not really new. As I announced on Instagram about a month ago I have decided to join Emma Watson‘s feminist book club called «Our Shared Shelf» on Goodreads. My reason number one for joining is that it‘s Emma friggin‘ Watson, and basically if Hermione Granger opened a book club I‘d join without hesitation. But I also figured that I don‘t really know anything about feminism. I can see why women would need it in, say, Saudi-Arabia, but I have never really thought about why feminism might also be important to me personally. So reading a book about it every month might really be an eye opener.

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Last month‘s book was called My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem. It was a bit hard to get by which is why I finished reading it a little later than originally planned. There is a huge discussion board on Goodreads, but I‘m usually so busy that I can‘t really take the time to actively participate in the discussions; however, I decided to read through some of the arguments and put them on my blog. If anyone still wants to discuss certain aspects or opinions, please feel free to do so in the comment section. 🙂

First of all, the blurb:

«Gloria Steinem had an itinerant childhood. Every fall, her father would pack the family into the car and they would drive across the country, in search of their next adventure. The seeds were planted: Steinem would spend much of her life on the road, as a journalist, organizer, activist, and speaker. In vivid stories that span an entire career, Steinem writes about her time on the campaign trail, from Bobby Kennedy to Hillary Clinton; her early exposure to social activism in India; organizing ground-up movements in America; the taxi drivers who were “vectors   of modern myths” and the airline stewardesses who embraced feminism; and the infinite contrasts, the “surrealism in everyday life” that Steinem encountered as she travelled back and forth across the country. With the unique perspective of one of the greatest feminist icons of the 20th and 21st centuries, here is an inspiring, profound, enlightening memoir of one woman’s life-long journey.»

To me, one of the first and most important aspects of feminism that Gloria Steinem mentions is that of a functional community that listens to the needs of others. Or as she puts it:

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This doesn‘t just count for women but really for people in general. Women are just one group that is or was being oppressed, depending on region and culture. So feminism is about injustice being heard. And not just that – she states right in the beginning that helping somebody, be it women, men or children, you have to go about understanding them and their situation, every aspect of it:

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This can not be stressed enough. Steinem later tells the story of how she once tried to save a turtle by putting it back in the sea. Her teacher then explained to her that this turtle had just spent weeks crawling up the beach to lay its eggs – now it would have to start over. Her conclusion:

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To me that means that we can‘t, for example, just tell women in the Middle East to stop obeying their husbands. I, at least, am in no way entitled to do that. I know very little of their culture and I can not possibly fathom the outcome of such protest. Wouldn‘t everyone agree that Malala is a feminist? Yet, she wears a headscarf, just like millions of women do, and our western society tries to tell them that this is sexist and limits them in their freedom. How many women have we asked? Sure, they should be able to decide for themselves, and many aren‘t allowed to make such decisions – but unless someone from their own culture takes her headscarf off as an act of female liberation, many women will not even want that «freedom.» And I certainly have no say in it. Scrolling through Goodreads I found a few interesting comments on the topic and I take the liberty to quote them here (since Goodreads is a public sphere already):

«As a domestic violence survivor a friend of a friend used to try to help me by being mean to my abuser after we broke up. Nothing could have bothered me more than that because I felt that I had sacrificed years of my life to make him happy and someone making him miserable now was not a comfort to me, but even when I told her that she kept doing it. I loved this story because it reminded me of that and it gave me a way to remember that I have to make sure I’m doing the right thing for others.»

«I’m Mexican, which means my darker skin gives me away whenever I go on vacations to the US, and something that gets to me every time is the condescending looks people give me. People constantly talk to me slowly, as if I was stupid, when they don’t know that I’ve studied English ever since I was two years old. And when I reply with good English they look surprised, it’s insulting. As Latins we are constantly misrepresented as illiterate, lazy or even stupid. And even when I know I am privileged, it bothers me that people think they can put an entire nation down just because of the stereotypes they are bombarded with.»

That actually leads to another thread that I never even considered a part of the feminist movement: race. This certainly has a lot to do with the fact that I live in Switzerland where racism, although prominently existant, is not to be compared with racism in the United States. I never realised the obvious fact that black women in a white world would struggle twice as hard as their male counterparts – once because of the colour of their skin and the discrimination they had or have to face because of that, and twice because of their feminity that would discriminate them in both black and white cultures. I always think that stating somebody‘s skin colour is in itself a racist act – why should I care whether that girl next door has brown or white or purple skin?! But Steinem made me realise that in certain contexts it‘s an essential piece of information. Not because it necessarily says something about the person, but it says a lot about the society around them.

The author naturally also takes into account Native American societies. What I didn‘t know either was that gender roles aren‘t simply a given. They have changed throughout history and gender equality was a given in certain cultures. Steinem quotes Paula Gunn Allen:

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There is an incredible amount of topics Golria Steinem touches and discusses in her work and it‘s simply not possible to spread them out in a single blog post. I believe that the most essential thing I have learned so far is that feminism equals the fight for human rights. This doesn‘t come as a surprise, but feminism as a word has become more of an insult than the definition of an activist movement. It does not consider simple aspects of human rights such as a woman‘s control over her own body or the male rape victims or domestic violence. One very interesting opinion of Gloria Steinem‘s is the following:

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It‘s such an interesting thought that human rights would start with the fair treatment of women. I‘m not sure I entirely agree, and this quote will definitely have to be put in context. But it is certainly a thought I‘ll keep taking into account and that I might come back to on this blog as well.

My Life on the Road is a very moving and interesting read; I think I agree on almost everything Gloria Steinem has to say. She is definitely not a man hating, non-shaving women‘s libber that so many of my gender fear to be or seen as (and if you are, then good on you! There‘s nothing wrong with that either. Except, don‘t hate men. Don‘t hate, ‘k?)

I definitely recommend this book, even, and especially, if you don‘t consider yourself a feminist!

Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

Sexy Books: Fools Rush In by Bill Carter

Just read: Fools Rush In by Bill Carter

I have been so excited to finally talk about this book! It has become one of my absolute favourites and I think everyone should read it, because there is so much to gain from it!

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Fools Rush In tells the story of Bill Carter who visits Bosnia in the 1990ies during the Siege of Sarajevo. He helps distribute food and other goods, he goes to rock concerts and parties and he finds friends.

Basically, the blurb already says it all:

«Some trips are chosen, some choose you. When tragedy strikes Bill Carter‘s life he finds himself drawn to a war zone. In the modern heart of darkness, the besieged city of Sarajevo, we meet a man rebuilding the ruins of his former self in the most unlikely of places. Carter joins a maverick aid organization, „The Serious Road Trip“, and dodges snipers to deliver food and supplies to those the UN can‘t reach. He makes friends with the artistic community of Sarajevo and fights alongside them for survival in a place where food and water are scarce, where you meet death every day, but crucially where life, love and laughter ring out all the same.
Carter takes his journey one surreal step further and enlists the help of major rock band U2. The ensuing events go no small way to influencing the course of the war and Western awareness of it.»

There is no way I can do this book justice by writing this review, so I‘m not even going to try. But let me tell you this: it wrenched my heart, it reduced me to tears, it made me giggle hysterically, it sent shivers down my spine – but most importantly, it gave me back some faith that even the smallest person can change the course of events. It had me believe that there are people who care and who stand above themselves. Not just Bill Carter, who just seemed to be acting without much further thinking, but also U2. Bono offered the band‘s help and meant it. During their 1993 world tour they did satellite link-ups where Sarajevans were broadcast onto stage and told their stories to so many people. Please, just look at this video!

Fools Rush In is such a genuine story, and it‘s really a work of philosophy. Bill Carter writes in large parts about loss and love and family and home – things that essentially have nothing to do with war, but have everything to do with life. And life just appears to be going on during any war.

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I know the Bosnian War has long passed, but there are so many other tragedies taking place in the world, and the least we can do is not turn our backs. Let‘s talk about it. Let‘s not pretend there aren‘t any people suffering. No one is required to go into a war zone and risk their life, of course not. But who has ever stood up to a bully or paired up with the unpopular kid at school? If anything, this book makes us care about each other.
It‘s a life changing read, I promise!

Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

Sexy Books: The Empire Strikes Back by Donald F. Glut

Just read: Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back by Donald F. Glut.

I wasn‘t going to talk about this book, I really wasn‘t because, you know, it‘s a novelisation! But then I read it and as far as novelisations go (which, btw, isn‘t very far at all) it was really quite okay. In fact, it‘s the okayest novelisation I have read in a long time!

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I‘m sure everybody knows what Star Wars is about, but I‘ll give you the blurb anyway, if only because I love the word blurb.

«Though the Rebel Alliance won a significant battle, the war against the Empire has only just begun.
Several months have passed, and the Rebels have established a hidden outpost on the frozen wasteland of Hoth. But even on that icy backwater planet, they cannot escape the evil Darth Vader‘s notice for long.
Soon Luke, Han, Princess Leia, and their faithful companions will be forced to flee, scattering in all direction – with the Dark Lord‘s minions in fevered pursuit…»

I have a pretty clear image what «the Dark Lord‘s minions» look like, and the internet has not failed me! It just takes the edge off the entire saga a bit when THIS is what stormtroopers really look like!

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But moving on! Novelisations always have that exciting feature of telling you a little something that isn‘t included in the movie, and there are always small surprises, like a variation in dialogue or a change of action; many things that might not work in a movie, can happen still between te pages of a book. And besides, the book doesn‘t have to be incredibly good because all it does is still my inner geeky needs. And this one certainly did!

What I loved most, of course, was that there is some extended action between Han and Leia. C-3PO doesn‘t interrupt their kiss and that actually makes the entire scene more endearing. My favourite thing about the book, however, is the fact that Leia calls Han «Hot Shot» – repeatedly so!

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Leia has even more jazz in this book version than she already does in the movies, which I absolutely love. Still, my favourite part of the book has got to be when they settle in Cloud City and Han tries to win her over:

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Of course the book isn‘t just a sloppy Han-Leia fanfiction novel, it covers all the fun parts that we love in the film as well. It‘s just that Luke never call Yoda a «Hot Shot», or he might have got a bigger mention here!

Have a lovely (snowy?) afternoon!
Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

Sexy Books: Dream a Little Dream by Giovanna Fletcher

Just read: Dream a Little Dream by Giovanna Fletcher.

I‘m going to try and be a bit better with book reviews this year, since this is the kind of thing I enjoy reading the most myself. And maybe be a bit more active on Goodreads, too. And finish reading all the novels I have started reading simultaneously. Good plan!

I absolutely adored reading Dream a Little Dream, and I think the reason for that comes down to the fact that once you‘ve heard Giovanna Fletcher talk you can‘t not love her books! She has the loveliest squeaky voice and whenever I read one of her novels I just imagine her narrating it and that makes it very hard to put the book down.

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I know I only rated it three stars on Goodreads, that is because it‘s not actually a good book (oh, how it pains me to say this). It‘s not incredibly well written, not very original and there are some seriously awkward sex scenes. Plus, at one point Giovanna‘s husband, Tom Fletcher, pops into one of the protagonist‘s dreams which is, you know, a little weird. Also, I feel like she‘s trying very hard not to describe herself and her own pretty little life by creating a character who‘s in her late twenties, unmarried and a bit cynical towards her parents‘ posh lifestyle. Yet, I‘m sure Giovanna‘s way of living is pretty posh (being married to the lead singer of McFly must be some perk, right?).

All that being said, the story is incredibly heart warming and made me cry towards the end.   I fell completely in love with Real Brett for being such an utter sweetheart throughout the entire book, he made me yearn for raspberry jam (I now have a jar in my fridge!) and, yeah, he did make me believe in true love again (not that I ever not believe in that. I just like the confirmation). So, if that peaks your interest, here‘s the blurb for you:

Sarah is doing just fine. Sure she’s been single for the last five years, and has to spend an uncomfortable amount of time around her ex-boyfriend and their mutual friends, and the rest at her tediously mundane job, but it’s fine. She’s happy(ish). But it’s not surprising that when Sarah starts dreaming about a handsome stranger, she begins looking forward to falling asleep at night. Reality isn’t nearly as exciting. That is until her dream-stranger makes an unexpected real-life appearance, leaving Sarah questioning everything she thought she wanted. Because people never really find the person of their dreams… do they?

Basically, Dream a Little Dream is a soap opera in book form, and I firmly believe that anything that comes in the shape of a book is better than television. It contains a couple of super cute quotes and is a very good read when all cuddled up in a blanket while «the wheather outside is frightful»! (Ha! See what I did there?)

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Lots of love from the roots of my heart!
xxx

Also, here’s a video from Giovanna Fletcher’s Youtube channel because she is one lovely lovely lady and you’ll fall in love with her INSTANTLY!

Blogmas (Day 7) – My December Must-Reads

Oh Happy Day!
I just passed my final exam for this month and the taste of liberty is ever so sweet. This means that I finally get to read bad romance novels again. Excessively. Of course December is a special time to get involved with books – at least for a Christmas fanatic like me! So for today‘s post I decided to share some of my absolute favourites with you! Enjoy!
 

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Harry Potter and the Philosopher‘s Stone (J.K. Rowling)
I know this is not strictly speaking a Christmas novel. But Christmases at Hogwarts always seem to be particularly festive. The armours carol, there‘s a massive dinner and everybody gets the coolest presents. I wanted to have an Invisibility Cloak so badly when I was little!

 

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Shiver (Maggie Stiefvater)
To me Maggie‘s stories are the ultimate books to curl up with on cold winter days. The story is about Sam who turns into a wolf every year when the cold comes. But now he‘s human and Grace, the protagonist, wants to keep him warm and around at all costs. This book absolutely completely ruined me! It‘s that good!

 

Source: www.pinterest.com
Source: http://www.pinterest.com

Let It Snow (Maureen Johnson, John Green & Lauren Myracle)
Now this is all about Christmas. It contains three individual love stories that are all somehow linked, and then there‘s a great finale at the end. It‘s just perfect to get into the Christmas mood. And I laughed. Like, the whole time!

 

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 Christmas with Billy and Me (Giovanna Fletcher)
Can I just say, the reason I enjoy reading Giovanna Fletcher so much is because I like watching her so much. Whenever there‘s a part of the story that I don‘t like I imagine her reading it out loud and it makes it all better. She‘s such a lovable lady! Christmas with Billy and Me is a spin-off from the original Billy and Me in which Sophie, an anxious small town girl, meets Billy, a famous actor. They fall in love and I can promise you some kind of Happy End, because, you know, they have Christmas together in the spin-off. It‘s a gorgeous little story that had me well up in tears.

 

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Hogfather (Terry Pratchett)
Now this is my all time favourite Christmas Story! Very short summary: Death plays Santa Clause. It‘s hilarious, just read it!

 

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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (C.S. Lewis)
It‘s always winter, but it‘s never Christmas. You have no idea just how many wardrobes I entered, hoping I would somehow find myself in Narnia (I was the most gullible child, I swear!). There is so much to this little book that defines Christmas for me

 

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My True Love Gave To Me (edited by Stephanie Perkins)
My Honduran host brother got me this last year and I have to say it‘s a perfect match. I love the song from which the title derives, I love the cover and I love almost all the authors that contributed their short stories to this gorgeous work.

It‘s only 18 more days until Christmas and I‘m now going to be spending most of my time away from uni working in the book shop. Book shops are such a magical and beautiful place, especially in winter. I actually love this place so much that I still hang out in the shop‘s café during my free time and just read. And if you‘re wondering, I‘ll now be reading Dream a Little Dream by Giovanna Fletcher. Aaaahh, it‘ll be fabulous!

Of course Anna has also created a list of her favourite books to read in December, so make sure you have a look at her blog on www.tinytrinket.wordpress.com. Actually, I can‘t wait, because I limited myself to seven books and I have a zillion books more I could tell you about right now! So, little consolidation: more books on Annas‘s blog!

Lots of Love from the Roots of my Heart!
xxx

I’m a Slytherin

So, a while ago I took the Sorting-Hat-Test on Pottermore and, as it turns out, I‘m a Slytherin. What really has surprised me about this result is how utterly upset I was for days after that. I know it‘s just a silly test that can‘t be taken all that seriously, and I continuously laugh at people who cry about being sorted into Hufflepuff, but we all have a picture inside our heads of who we are and who we want to be, and heck, I‘m a nice girl. I got Rapunzel in the «Which Disney Princess Are You?» test on Buzzfeed. I‘m quirkie, I love polka dots on dresses, I adore the colour pink and my favourite piece of clothing is my Stitch onesie. I‘m just a silly little person who prefers Taylor Swift over classical music. And now J. K. Rowling just tells me I‘m a Slytherin, I‘m in the house of Voldemort, of the Malfoys, of Crabbe and Goyle, Snape is my head teacher, the bloody baron is the house ghost, and we live in a dungeon! I‘m not going to Hogwarts and I don‘t have to live ina dungeon, but this thought scared me so much! Weird, huh?

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But the longer I‘ve thought about it the more Slytherin has been growing on me. What if the image I have of myself just isn‘t accurate? I would make one cool Slytherin student – I would be the first Slytherin to be invited into the Gryffindor common room, I‘d be the Slytherin who bakes cupcakes for everyone and spends all her free time in the library with Hermione Granger. Who ever said that just because according to J.K. Rowling I‘m in Slytherin I‘m evil? I‘m not mean or scary, or to quote Dan Howell: «I‘m about as violent and intimidating as a pink butterfly!»

But maybe I‘m more than I thought I was, and maybe that‘s why it‘s scary to find ourselves in a picture we never pictured ourselves in. What if I‘m more than a princess in a pretty dress? That just opens a whole new dimension for me. Like, I could wear a leather jacket and I would still be me. Or, I don‘t know, I could not help someone for once and just have a cup of tea and watch the clouds. Or, gee, I could even tell somebody no straight to their face and not feel terrible about it!

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It‘s not actually necessary to take a test to challenge your own personality. It‘s just a good thing to remember that being evil doesn‘t come with a name, it comes with actions. Everything we are does. Telling me that I‘m a Slytherin never meant I should stop doing the things I love, it just tagged me as someone who is also brave and tough and sees things through. And I think that is an image I would very much like to adapt to. (Also, Draco’s kinda hot, soo… ^^)

Ciao for now!
xxx